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Commentary

Outside the Four Corners of the Charter

By Catherine Ma   Asper Centre Constitutional Law Symposium, Panel III: Outside the Four Corners of the Charter The afternoon panel of the Asper Centre’s October 20th 2017 Constitutional Law Symposium for Canada’s Sesquicentennial, titled Outside the Four Corners of the Charter, included papers that reflected on the development of Canadian constitutional law beyond the Charter. … Read More

Asper Centre Constitutional Law Symposium, Panel II: Seminal Cases for Past Reflection and Future Consideration

By Ryan Howes   The presentations that comprised the Asper Centre’s Constitutional Law Symposium panel titled “Seminal Cases for Past Reflection and Future Consideration” featured Ben Berger, Associate Dean and Associate Professor, Osgoode Hall Law School; Richard Moon, Professor, University of Windsor, Faculty of Law; and Margot Young, Professor, University of British Columbia, Allard School … Read More

Asper Centre Constitutional Law Symposium, Panel I: Section 7 of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms

By: Chris Puskas and Nic Martin On October 20th 2017, the Asper Center convened a Constitutional Law Symposium for Canada’s Sesquicentennial.  The papers presented in the Symposium formed part of the 2017 Asper Centre Constitutional Roundtables series focused on the development of Canadian constitutional law since Confederation. The packed venue at the University of Toronto, … Read More

Asper Centre Alumni Network 5 in 5 Event

by Ryan Howes On November 2, 2017, the Asper Centre hosted its inaugural Alumni Network event, a “5 in 5” panel in which five alumni each had five minutes to discuss an interesting advocacy case or initiative that they have worked on in their respective practices.  Breese Davies, the Asper Centre’s 2017 Constitutional Litigator-in-Residence moderated, introduced … Read More

Asper Centre to support efforts in challenging solitary confinement in Canada

by Tal Schreier Long periods of solitary confinement can have a devastating impact on the mental and physical well-being of prisoners. Ending solitary confinement is not only morally just but also has practical benefits of improving public safety as prisoners who have been subject to solitary confinement often experience problems re-entering into society and have … Read More